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Page 1: Sabian Island – Sailing
Page 2: Saint and Greavsie – SAS Assault Course
Page 3: SAS Combat Simulator – Scooby and Scrappy Doo
Page 4: Scooby Doo – SDAW
Page 5: SDI – Sepulcri
Page 6: Sgt. Helmet Training Day 2020 – Shadow of the Beast
Page 7: Shadow Skimmer – Sharpe's Deeds
Page 8: Sherman M4 – Shufflepuck Café
Page 9: Side Arms – The Simpsons: Bart vs. the Space Mutants
Page 10: Sir Ababol – Skate or Die
Page 11: Skate Rock – Slap Fight
Page 12: Slapshot – The Smirking Horror
Page 13: Smugglers Cove – Soccer 86
Page 14: Soccer Pinball – Sol Negro
Page 15: Solo – Soul of a Robot
Page 16: Souls of Darkon – Space Harrier
Page 17: Space Harrier II – Spaghetti Western Simulator
Page 18: Spannerman – Spike in Transylvania
Page 19: Spiky Harold – Spooked
Page 20: Spooky Castle – Sram
Page 21: Sram 2 – Star Driver
Page 22: Stardust – Star Sabre
Page 23: Starstrike II – Steve Davis Snooker
Page 24: Steve McQueen Westphaser – Streaker
Page 25: Street Cred' Boxing – Stress
Page 26: Strider – Stryfe
Page 27: STUN Runner – Subterranean Stryker
Page 28: Subway Vigilante – Super Cycle
Page 29: Super Flippard – Supernudge 2000
Page 30: Super Pac – Super Sprint
Page 31: Super Stock Car – Surprise Surprise
Page 32: The Survivor – The Sword of Ianna
Page 33: Sword of the Samurai – Syntax
Screenshot of Soccer Pinball

Soccer Pinball

(Code Masters, 1992)

Soccer and pinball – when you think about it, it almost makes sense. As you’d expect, the pinball table is laid out in the form of a football pitch, the aim being to get rid of each of the defenders blocking the way, and then scoring three goals to go on to the next table – which has exactly the same layout, but with more defenders. Whether you’ll actually be able to score three goals seems to be a matter of sheer fluke; the game is too difficult and the goalmouth is too small, letting down an otherwise novel concept. Out of interest, it also uses the cassette motor as a sound effect... bizarre!

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Screenshot of Soccer Rivals

Soccer Rivals

(Cult, 1991)

A football management game combined with a board game – it sounds interesting, but after a few goes you begin to realise its limitations. Three players, which can be human or computer-controlled, choose to manage one of 32 teams and take it in turns to move around the board. Each square on the board triggers an event; one type of square lets you buy new players, another lets you set up a youth team and coach, or to make improvements to your stadium, while another lets you train your players. There are also ‘chance’ squares which may win or lose you money. The problem is that you can only perform actions when you land on the right square, which may take one turn or ten turns. Football management games should be based on skill and not luck.

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Screenshot of Soccer Star

Soccer Star

(Cult, 1989)

You’re the manager of a 4th Division football team; you get to choose which one at the beginning of the game. Can you manage the team to the top of the 1st Division? For some reason, each division consists of only eight teams, and you can only buy players at the beginning of a season – and the large majority of them are inexperienced and available on a free transfer. You can obtain one player on loan at a time, which is useful, since they’re often better than the other players in your squad, who will frequently be afflicted by injury. The match highlights are fairly entertaining to watch; a ball bounces to and fro, representing the balance of play, and when there’s an opportunity for a team to score, you get to watch the action – although it looks rather basic. As a simulation, it’s rather flawed and it lacks detail and realism.

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Screenshot of Software House

Software House

(Cult, 1988)

What’s it like to be the manager of your own software house and release some games? This game lets you try this out. Your aim is to survive for five years, but you start out with a budget of only £2,500, and if you go more than £25,000 into debt, it’s all over. In each quarter (which counts as one turn), you can select one or more games to buy, and then it’s your job to organise the duplication of tapes and the artwork, packaging, price and the number of advertisements to place in magazines. After each turn, you then read the Games News magazine which has news of how well you’re doing and how good or bad they think your latest game is. It’s all good fun, although it can be frustrating and unpredictable most of the time.

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Screenshot of Software Star

Software Star

(Addictive, 1984)

You’re a games programmer at a software house, and you want to achieve the title of Software Star. Games are developed and released, and each month you get to see how well they’re doing in the software charts; getting in the top three is crucial if you want to be known, and good reviews count, too! Other tasks you have to perform include booking adverts, removing old games from your catalogue, and whether to use hype or honesty to sell your games. Any initial excitement about the game begins to wear off; even on the beginner level, it’s too difficult.

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Screenshot of Solar Coaster

Solar Coaster

(Optyx, 1987)

Yawn – it’s yet another Galaxian clone. This one has only four levels; three of these feature a formation of aliens hurling laser beams at you, while the fourth sees you fighting against the aliens’ mothership. We’ve seen it all before. The graphics are actually not too bad and are quite colourful, but the sound effects are nothing special. The game itself is a bit difficult; while the alien ships whizz about the screen and fire at you (and those lasers seem to home in on you), your spacecraft moves rather slowly – but practice makes perfect. Even so, there are better games than this out there.

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Screenshot of Solar Empire

Solar Empire

(Players, 1990)

The evil Dargons have enslaved the galaxy, and you must free as many planets in the galaxy as you can. How do you do this? You must find an asteroid and shoot it, allowing you to steer it in a particular direction. Captured planets will be liberated if you manage to crash an asteroid into it. It seems like an extremely drastic method of liberating a planet, but I’m not responsible for devising this game! Obviously, you have the usual aliens to contend with, as well as the fact that your spaceship is very snake-like in both appearance and manoeuvrability. There are also several dials that tell you the nearest location of various objects. The graphics are quite good, although the screen is mostly empty space. However, for some reason, I don’t really warm to this game much.

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Screenshot of Solar Warrior

Solar Warrior

(Skyslip Software, 1988)

Reviewed by Robert Small

Defend Earth’s solar system in this shoot-’em-up. The game begins with a mission on Pluto. You start off at the controls of your space fighter. Immediately you come under attack from the enemy. The controls and scrolling are good and the sound effects are decent. You rendezvous with a larger ship in orbit and are tasked with landing on the planet’s surface. This is a bit of an acquired taste and can be frustrating due to the controls. Once you have landed you take control of a tank with three directions of simultaneous fire and the ability to hop over crevices. The graphics are in Mode 0 and, as mentioned before, scroll well. This game offers some good horizontally scrolling action.

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Screenshot of Soldier of Light

Soldier of Light

(ACE, 1989)

Reviewed by Pug

Playing Xain, you must travel to various human planets (three in total) infested with alien intruders. In this slow and jerky scrolling shoot-’em-up, you move along, taking out enemies with the occasional power-up available. Each planet has a boss to fight once you make it to the end of the zone. The graphics are quite good in this one, although at times a little too garish, but the sluggish movement and scrolling just ruin this one game-wise. The in-game sound effects are nothing to write about either.

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Screenshot of Sol Negro

Sol Negro

(Opera Soft, 1988)

Bully and Mónica are both cursed. Every full moon, one of them turns into an animal, while the other regains their human form. This prevents them both from being together, so they wait until there is a total eclipse and they can visit an underwater temple where the curse can be removed. In the first part, you control Bully, and you must find the key to release Mónica (who has turned into a hawk) from her cage and reach the temple. The roles are reversed in the second part, where you control Mónica, who is accompanied by Bully (who has turned into a fish). What a strange story for a game! Well, the graphics are very nice indeed and really detailed. Unfortunately, even with twenty (!) lives, the game is still frustratingly difficult, particularly in the second part.

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z