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Page 1: Sabian Island – Saint and Greavsie
Page 2: St. Dragon – SAS Combat Simulator
Page 3: SAS Strike Force – Scooby Doo
Page 4: Scoop – SDI
Page 5: Seabase Delta – Sgt. Helmet Training Day 2020
Page 6: Sergeant Seymour Robotcop – Shadow Skimmer
Page 7: The Shadows of Sergoth – Sherman M4
Page 8: Shinobi – Sideral War
Page 9: Sidewalk – Sir Ababol NES-OM Edition
Page 10: Sir Fred – Skate Wars
Page 11: Skatin' USA – Sliders
Page 12: Slightly Magic – Snoball in Hell
Page 13: Snodgits – Soccer Rivals
Page 14: Soccer Star – Solomon's Key
Page 15: Sonic Boom – Southern Belle
Page 16: Soviet – Space Hawks
Page 17: Space Invaders – Special Operations
Page 18: Speed King – Spindizzy
Page 19: Spindrone – Sporting Triangles
Page 20: Sport of Kings – Stainless Steel
Page 21: Stairway to Hell – Star Firebirds
Page 22: Starfox – Starting Blocks
Page 23: Star Trap – Stockmarket
Page 24: Stomp – Street Cred' Football
Page 25: Street Fighter – Strider II
Page 26: Strike! – Stunt Bike Simulator
Page 27: Stunt Car Racer – Sudoku
Page 28: Sudoku Master – Super Gran
Page 29: Super Hang-On – Super Pipeline II
Page 30: Super Sam – Super Stunt Man
Page 31: Super Tank Simulator – Survivor
Page 32: Survivors – Sword Slayer
Page 33: Syntax
Screenshot of Sonic Boom

Sonic Boom

(Activision, 1990)

Fly the highly sophisticated and well armed fighter jet, the Sonic Boom, engaging it in six different conflicts across the continents of the world. Nothing original in the plot, then; it’s another vertically scrolling shoot-’em-up. However, it’s quite good, mainly because of the beautiful graphics and the fact that the difficulty level is such that you can complete most of the six levels without too many problems – although it’s perhaps a little too easy. There aren’t many power-ups to collect – extra firepower is more or less all you can get – but the variety of end-of-level combats you face is interesting.

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Screenshot of Sootland

Sootland

(Zafiro, 1989)

What sort of a name is Sootland? I don’t know, but it’s one of those target shooting games where you have to aim your crosshairs at the bad guys before they shoot you. This one is an American western-style shooting match, and there are three levels, each with four screens. All you do is scroll between them and find the cowboy popping his head through the scenery – they only appear one at a time, and when you’ve shot him, you have to find the next one, which means more scrolling. This goes on and on, but you just don’t know how many of the bad guys you’re supposed to kill. The graphics and sound are both pitiful, and it’s such an unbelievably awful game.

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Screenshot of Sooty and Sweep

Sooty and Sweep

(Alternative Software, 1989)

All of Sweep’s bones have gone missing, so it’s the task of Sooty and/or Sweep to search Matthew Corbett’s house and collect the bones. You can play on your own or with a friend as either Sooty or Sweep, and there are also two difficulty levels, which control how much time you’ve got and how many bones there are to collect. Unfortunately, you can only collect one bone at a time and give it to Soo before you can get another one. You’ll also need to watch out for the insects flying about the house! The game is clearly one for very young players, as everyone else will find it far too easy – and why are the graphics in monochrome?

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Screenshot of Sorcerer

Sorcerer

(Infocom, 1986)

After defeating the warlock Krill in Enchanter, you now have your own room in the Circle of Enchanters, but Belboz, the leader of the Circle, has gone missing, and of course, you must find him, or the Circle of Enchanters is in big trouble. The game again consists of exploring the Guild Hall and then exploring the land, gathering scrolls and using them to cast spells. However, this time, you don’t have to worry about finding food and drink, and several potions can also be found in the game. The difficulty level is greater than in Enchanter, with a glass maze, and another puzzle involving time travel in which you meet an older version of yourself! I think this is the best of the three games in Infocom’s Enchanter series.

See also: Enchanter, Spellbreaker.

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Screenshot of Sorcerers

Sorcerers

(SalvaKantero, 2020)

The sorcerer Einar has passed away, and his son Sven wants to ensure that the knowledge contained in Einar’s library isn’t lost forever, so he decides to explore the castle and unlock the spells that his father has cast on the doors. On each level you must prepare a potion by collecting coins and purchasing ingredients. You have to take care to obtain exactly the ingredients you need and get them in the correct order, or you’ll have to throw your potion away and start again. This game finished in second place in the 2020 #CPCRetroDev Game Creation Contest, and it’s pretty good, with colourful, cartoon-like graphics and jaunty music. Having to throw your entire potion away if you’ve already collected several ingredients and then make a mistake is annoying, but it’s still a very good game overall.

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Screenshot of Sorcery

Sorcery

(Virgin Games, 1985)

Reviewed by Pug

Find and free the captured wizards! The evil Necromancer has locked them away and only certain items will free them. This game helped establish the CPC as a rival to other machines. Its graphics were quite simply amazing – a never before seen split screen incorporating Mode 0 and Mode 1! The Mode 0 graphics made good use of the colour palette and everyone drooled over them. Ultra-smooth sprites moved along with no flicker and this made the game an enjoyable challenge. A heralding tune plays upon loading with sparse in-game sound effects, but this doesn’t matter. It’s a hard game to beat but definitely worth a try. An icon in the CPC’s history.

See also: Sorcery+.

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Screenshot of Sorcery+

Sorcery+

(Amsoft, 1985)

Reviewed by Alain Schroetter

This game is the sequel to one of the most famous games on the CPC – Sorcery, widely used by Amstrad to promote the CPC because the graphics were very nice at the time the game was released. The first part is more or less the same as in Sorcery, but it is a bit easier. The real plus of the game is in the second part, in which you have to find four golden hearts to defeat the evil necromancer. The game provides good graphics and fast animation and it is really addictive. It is not too large, so you won’t get lost easily, and the difficulty is well balanced. Just a little hint; in the second part, drop the ‘roland’ statuette into the water (in the ‘bridge’ room) to get the fourth golden heart.

See also: Sorcery.

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Screenshot of Soul of a Robot

Soul of a Robot

(Mastertronic, 1986)

A computer is still running the planet Nonterraqueous, and a robot with the mind of a man is sent out with a bomb so that the computer can be destroyed. The computer lies within a large maze filled with platforms, and you have to jump to reach them. However, some platforms are higher than others and you’ll need to adjust the jumping power of the robot. The thing is, the robot is a bit slow, and with the many monsters about, you’ll probably hit one of them and come tumbling back to the floor and maybe lose a life. Before long, frustration sets in after you realise that getting anywhere is too tricky.

See also: Into Oblivion, Nonterraqueous.

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Screenshot of Souls of Darkon

Souls of Darkon

(Taskset, 1985)

Reviewed by Piero Serra

The angry-looking Minotaur on the Souls of Darkon cover and loading screen put me in mind of a Greek myth, but this text adventure in fact has a science fiction setting. You and your robot companion Komputa are on a quest to destroy the evil Darkon on planet Megron. Initially I was quite impressed with the atmosphere created by the writing and stylish typeface. The layout and graphics are unfussy, and solving puzzles relies on a combination of what you read and what you can see in the pictures. As your quest progresses, however, the game begins to show its limitations. The puzzles themselves are uninspired and the world of Megron is actually a bit dull. After a few hours with it I didn’t have much desire to go further. Souls of Darkon is nicely presented but the setting and puzzles sadly did not live up to my initial expectations.

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Screenshot of Southern Belle

Southern Belle

(Appeared on an Amstrad Action covertape)

(Hewson, 1985)

The Southern Belle was a steam locomotive that carried passengers from London’s Victoria station to Brighton. This is a realistic simulation which faithfully recreates the 51-mile journey and allows you to take control of this famous train. Although there is a daunting range of controls, you can choose which ones you can manipulate, and leave the computer to work the remaining controls. In addition, there are several runs which vary in difficulty, and in order to pass them, you must achieve a rating of at least 70% overall. Starting with a training run, you can then try to cope with speed limits, maintenance works, stopping at stations, and attempting to beat the record of 48 minutes from Victoria to Brighton. The vector graphics are excellent, and even if you’re not a trainspotter, you may find the game to be a nice diversion once you’ve got the hang of it.

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